Garden Events

MARK YOUR CALENDAR – UPCOMING GARDENING EVENTS

Want to see your garden event here? Send your events to [email protected].

Due to the Coronavirus (COVID-19), some classes are still being held online. We encourage you to check with the organizer of these events for more details. Thank you.

JANUARY

Virtual Walk on the Wild Side: History of the Blomquist Garden
January 6, 11am-12noon
In this online presentation, the staff of the Blomquist Garden—curator Annabel Renwick, horticulturist Maegan Luckett, and assistant horticulturist Isaac Lund—will recount highlights from its 50 year history, including its origin, management and changes over time. Following registration, you will receive an email confirmation with the Zoom link, and a Zoom session recording will be sent to all registrants afterward. Free. Registration is at https://duke.is/nfz9u. Duke Gardens, Durham. gardens.duke.edu. 919-668-1707, [email protected]

Digital Photography Essentials Workshop for Canon Photographers
January 12, 19, 26, 6:30pm–8:30pm
With Mary Louise Ravese, Bella Vista Photography. This beginner class is for people with a Canon digital camera who are interested in learning how to successfully use their camera beyond automatic/program modes. The class concentrates on the five essential camera settings that have the most impact on the look of a photograph: focal length, aperture, shutter speed, ISO and white balance. We also discuss how to interpret the image histogram, a camera feedback mechanism, and use that information to adjust and optimize image exposure for the next shot. Students learn how to adjust these settings using their own camera. The features and concepts discussed are relevant to all digital cameras including many point-and-shoot cameras, mirrorless cameras and all digital SLR cameras. This class is limited to only Canon camera users to make it easier to address participant questions in this online class format. Fee. Pre-Registration. JC Raulston Arboretum, Raleigh. jcra.ncsu.edu.

Lunchbox Talk: How Trees Can Save the World – And What We Can Do To Help

January 13, 12noon-1pm
What are some of our most pressing environmental issues? How can trees can solve these issues? Most importantly, what can we do to help? Spoiler alert: it’s properly planting new trees and responsibly caring for the ones we have. How do we properly plant new trees? How can we care for existing trees in a manner that maximizes positive benefits for all members of our ecosystem? We’ll teach you how to do these things, as well as how to avoid common pitfalls. Trees were – and are – one of Nature’s most powerful tools for creating the planet we know and love today. If we plant many new trees and care for the ones we have, we can begin healing our planet. Healthy trees in abundance create happy people and a vibrant planet. Free; preregistration. North Carolina Botanical Garden, Chapel Hill. ncbg.unc.edu.

Digital Photography Essentials Workshop for Nikon Photographers
January 13, 20, 27, 6:30pm–8:30pm
With Mary Louise Ravese, Bella Vista Photography. This beginner class is for people with a Nikon digital camera who are interested in learning how to successfully use their camera beyond automatic/program modes. The class concentrates on the five essential camera settings that have the most impact on the look of a photograph: focal length, aperture, shutter speed, ISO and white balance. We also discuss how to interpret the image histogram, a camera feedback mechanism, and use that information to adjust and optimize image exposure for the next shot. Students learn how to adjust these settings using their own camera. The features and concepts discussed are relevant to all digital cameras including many point-and-shoot cameras, mirrorless cameras and all digital SLR cameras. This class is limited to only Nikon camera users to make it easier to address participant questions in this online class format. Fee. Pre-Registration. JC Raulston Arboretum, Raleigh. jcra.ncsu.edu.

Friends of the Arboretum Lecture
January 13, 7:30pm–9pm
“The Colorful History of America’s Plant Hardiness Zones, Including Our Zone 7(b)” with Thomas Packer, Extension Master Gardener Volunteer of Wake County. How the United States Department of Agriculture Plant Hardiness Zones came to be, what they mean, and why they are still in use almost 100 years after the first plant hardiness maps were developed. The presentation will include a review of early colorful, hand drawn maps from the archives of the Arnold Arboretum at Harvard University as well as the latest computer-generated maps from the USDA. Fee. Advance registration is not available for in-person attendees. Check-in available at the door. Registration for online attendees available at https://jcra.ncsu.edu/foa-lecture/. Fee. JC Raulston Arboretum, Raleigh. jcra.ncsu.edu. Fee. Pre-Registration. JC Raulston Arboretum, Raleigh. jcra.ncsu.edu.

Native Plants in the Durango, Colorado, Area
January 15, 10am–11:30am
With Tim Alderton, Research Technician, JC Raulston Arboretum. Cohosted by the Piedmont Chapter of the North American Rock Garden Society and the JC Raulston Arboretum. This program is being offered in person as well as online. Fee. Advance registration is not available for in-person participants. Check-in available at the door. Registration for online participants available at https://jcra.ncsu.edu/nargs/.

Drawing and Painting with Watercolor Pencils – Zoom Short Course
January 15, 1pm-4:30pm
Have you ever wondered what to do with those watercolor pencils gathering dust in your studio? They can be used to make beautiful art. Watercolor pencils are an interesting blend of drawing and painting. They are fantastic for field sketching, for making art while traveling, and for working plein air. Watercolor pencils can be used to make interesting textures and they make a good addition to watercolor painting, colored pencil, and mixed media. Join Kate for an introduction to various techniques using watercolor pencils as we all work on a project over Zoom. The class will have demonstration time as well as student work time. Kate will provide a photo and a drawing. Students are free to use their own subject and drawing as well. Fee; preregistration. North Carolina Botanical Garden, Chapel Hill. ncbg.unc.edu.

Outstanding Plants with Winter Interest
January 17-31, Mondays 6:30 pm–8:30 pm
Here is a great three-week class with Bryce Lane that focuses entirely on ornamental plants that have interesting winter interest. From flowers and fruits, to bark and branching, we will look at herbaceous annuals and perennials, as well as woody trees, shrubs, and vines. This will be a great class for those who are looking to enhance their winter landscape. Fee. Pre-Registration. JC Raulston Arboretum, Raleigh. jcra.ncsu.edu.

Photography Walk
January 21, 1pm–3:30pm
“Photographing Nature’s Design Close-up in the Greenhouse” with Mary Louise Ravese, Bella Vista Photography. When it’s chilly outdoors, it’s a great opportunity to turn to the greenhouse for photo opportunities. Join instructor Mary Louise Ravese at NC State University’s greenhouse conservatory where you’ll be able to photograph a variety of plants including orchids, tropicals, succulents, cactus, and more. Mary Louise will discuss how to showcase the shapes, colors, and textures of the conservatory plants’ foliage and flowers with your compositional design. In this month’s session, she will also explain the settings and techniques she uses to get close-up shots using an iPhone camera. Fee. Pre-Registration. JC Raulston Arboretum, Raleigh. jcra.ncsu.edu.

Garden Soils
January 22, 8:30am–3pm
As gardeners, we spend most of our time thinking “above ground.” We ruminate about plants, combinations, color, texture, and about light exposure, water, temperature and climate. Gardening success is equally dependent on what is going on below ground. A scientific understanding of soil chemistry, biology, physics, and fertility makes a good gardener a “master” gardener! This class with Bryce Lane will help us understand basic soil principles, and how we can use that understanding to improve our garden soils, properly prepare garden beds, reduce fertilizer inputs, compost, and maximize growth in our gardens. Fee. Pre-Registration. JC Raulston Arboretum, Raleigh. jcra.ncsu.edu.

Seasonal Celebrities: Winter Plants for Your North Carolina Garden
January 22, 10am-11am
In this online presentation with Jan Little, director of education and public programs at Duke Gardens, you will learn a palette of beautiful and useful plants. We’ll begin with a general horticulture discussion and then introduce a selection of trees, shrubs and perennials, noting their native region, culture, care, design attributes and history with people. Please join us for one or all Seasonal Celebrities sessions; register for each week from January 22 to March 12 separately. Following registration, you will receive an email confirmation with the Zoom link, and a Zoom session recording will be sent to all registrants afterward. Fee. Registration is at https://duke.is/nfz9u; register for additional sessions separately. Duke Gardens, Durham. gardens.duke.edu. 919-668-1707, [email protected]

Winter Tree ID
January 23, 8am-10am
Did you know you can identify trees during the winter by their bark and small bud markings on their limbs? Come learn how! Participants will receive field guides for local trees to keep and take home. This is an outdoor program and participants should dress for the weather conditions. Fee. Walnut Creek Wetlands, Raleigh. raleighnc.gov.

Gardening Adventures with Extension Master Gardener Volunteers
January 24, 10am–11:30am
“Color in Every Season” with Cindy Chappell, Extension Master Gardener Volunteer of Wake County. This program is being offered in person as well as online. Fee. Pre-Registration. JC Raulston Arboretum, Raleigh. jcra.ncsu.edu.

A New Look at Plants
January 25-February 1, Tuesdays 7pm-8pm
Plants are far more clever and inventive than scientists often recognize. Our understanding is flavored by time, place, culture and perspective. In this two-part online class with Anita Simha, PhD Candidate in the Duke University Biology Department, you will look at plants with fresh eyes, stepping away from describing them in human terms and seeing the wonders of plants more fully. Examining cultural biases also inspires a new look at traditions from other cultures and calls into question our notions of what is sufficiently important to record. From such a foundation, we can build a more holistic understanding of the plant world and of our place in nature. Co-sponsored by Triangle Land Conservancy, Ellerbe Creek Watershed Association, and Duke Gardens. Following registration, you will receive an email confirmation with the Zoom link, and a Zoom session recording will be sent to all registrants afterward. Fee. Pre-Registration. Sarah P. Duke Gardens, Durham. 919-668-1707. [email protected] gardens.duke.edu.

What’s Up in Winter? A Winter Walk Through the Culberson Asiatic Arboretum
January 26, 2pm-3pm
Winter is alive with beautiful, and often fragrant, plants. Join Paul Jones, curator of the William Louis Culberson Asiatic Arboretum, Duke Gardens for a walk through the Arboretum to find all the secrets of winter. You may see flowering camellias, buds plumping up on paperbush and wintersweet, flowers being protected from cold by the fuzzy bud scales covering magnolia blossoms, early blooming witchhazel, along with colorful bark on some maples and early blooming perennials or bulbs. Fee. Registration is at https://duke.is/nfz9u.Duke Gardens, Durham. gardens.duke.edu. 919-668-1707, [email protected]

Hybrid Lunchbox Talk: Saving the Wild South: The Fight for Native Plants on the Brink of Extinction
January 27, 12noon-1pm
The American South is famous for its astonishingly rich biodiversity. In her new book Saving the Wild South, Georgann Eubanks takes a wondrous trek from Alabama to North Carolina to search out native plants that are endangered and wavering on the edge of erasure. Even as she reveals the intricate beauty and biology of the South’s plant life, she also shows how local development and global climate change are threatening many species, some of which have been graduated to the federal list of endangered species. In this presentation, which also features color images from the book, Georgann will give an overview of the plants and people she visited across the region with a special focus on the species that are among the specimens in the Garden. Fee; preregistration. North Carolina Botanical Garden, Chapel Hill. ncbg.unc.edu.

Plant Propagation: Layering and Dividing
January 27, 2pm-3:30pm
Do you wish you had more of that lovely shrub? It’s amazing how rapidly young plants grow into a landscape. In this online presentation, Beth Hall Hoffman, Paul J. Kramer Plant Collections Manager and Jason Holmes, curator of the Doris Duke Center Gardens, Duke Gardens, will introduce you to the techniques of layering and dividing to grow new plants from those in your garden. Following registration, you will receive an email confirmation with the Zoom link, and a Zoom session recording will be sent to all registrants afterward. Fee. Pre-Registration. Sarah P. Duke Gardens, Durham. 919-668-1707. [email protected] gardens.duke.edu.

Climate Change and Community Action: Panel Discussion
January 27, 7pm-8pm
The impact of climate change is visible in our everyday lives, and many of us are seeking to focus national priorities on this challenge. Join us for this online webinar and panel presentation with Duke University students and faculty. You’ll hear from students Renata Kamakura and Jon Choi about their work with the Sunrise Movement, a youth movement seeking to stop climate change, as well as faculty members Ryke Longest, Nancy McLean and Megan Mullin. Free. Registration is at https://duke.is/nfz9u.Duke Gardens, Durham. gardens.duke.edu. 919-668-1707,919-668-1707. [email protected] gardens.duke.edu.

Green Life: Plant Adaptations
January 27-February 10, Thursdays 7pm-8:30pm
Unlike animals, including humans, plants are constrained to live in a fixed location. They can’t move about to obtain food or to avoid being eaten themselves. Join Alec Motten, associate professor emeritus at the Duke University Department of Biology for a lively look at how plants both respond to and shape their physical and biological environments in this three-part online class. Fee. Registration is at https://duke.is/nfz9u. Duke Gardens, Durham. gardens.duke.edu. Information: 919-668-1707, [email protected]e.edu.

Front-yard Foraging: Edible Ornamental Plants and Delicious Weeds, Too
January 29, 9am–11am
You can forage for delicious edibles right outside your front door. Turn your weeding chore into a feeding frenzy by harvesting edible weeds like purslane, chickweed, sorrel, dayflower, bedstraw, and many others. There are also ornamental plants in the average garden that are edible and delicious too: beautyberry, hibiscus, Solomon seal, daylily, and lots more. Horticulturist and forager Frank Hyman will share a slideshow featuring a year’s worth of delicious and nutritious edibles that thrive in the garden whether you plant them or not. Class includes a one-page handout, plenty of time for Q&A, sample plants to pass around, and a chance to buy signed copies of Frank ‘s book How to Forage for Mushrooms Without Dying as well as a colleague’s pocket sized book on foraging wild, edible plants. Fee. Pre-Registration. JC Raulston Arboretum, Raleigh. jcra.ncsu.edu.

Seasonal Celebrities: Winter Plants for Your North Carolina Garden
January 29, 10am-11am
In this online presentation with Jan Little, director of education and public programs at Duke Gardens, you will learn a palette of beautiful and useful plants. We’ll begin with a general horticulture discussion and then introduce a selection of trees, shrubs and perennials, noting their native region, culture, care, design attributes and history with people. Please join us for one or all Seasonal Celebrities sessions; register for each week from January 22 to March 12 separately. The plant list this week will include boxwoods (Buxus spp.), cedars (Juniperus spp.), arborvitae (Thuja spp.) and hemlock (Tsuga spp.). Fee. Registration is at https://duke.is/nfz9u; register for additional sessions separately. Duke Gardens, Durham. gardens.duke.edu. Information: 919-668-1707, [email protected]

Backyard Birds
January 29, 3pm
With Frank Doherty. Logan’s Garden Shop, Raleigh. 919-828-5337Logantrd.com.

Winter Flora
January 30-February 27, Sundays 1pm-4:30pm
This course is designed for a broad audience as well as for students who are enrolled in either of the Garden’s certificate programs. Field trips and exercises provide experience in the use of identification keys and recognition of plants in their winter condition in natural settings. Enjoy discovering that many trees and shrubs are easily recognized when not covered with leaves! Fee; preregistration. North Carolina Botanical Garden, Chapel Hill. ncbg.unc.edu.

Introduction to Mushroom Foraging: Learn a Year’s Worth of Wild Edible Mushrooms in One Day
January 30, 2pm-4pm
Want to learn to safely identify morels, black trumpets, chanterelles, and other delicious, edible mushrooms? Using slides, samples and clay models, learn to identify nine of most delicious mushrooms with professional forager and columnist Frank Hyman. A mushroom walk on any given day may only expose you to two or three edible mushroom—and that’s if the weather cooperates. In this class you can learn to identify an entire year’s worth of the best-tasting, easy to identify mushrooms (no poisonous look-alikes) presented in one indoor sitting. Class includes a slide show of professional photographs, display of tools and field guides, handout with resources, plenty of Q&A time and a chance to buy signed copies of Frank’s book: How to Forage for Mushrooms Without Dying. Learn more about Frank at www.frankhyman.com. Fee. Durham location—details with ticket purchase from [email protected]

FEBRUARY

New Naturalism: Designing, Planting and Gardening for Ecological Vibrancy at Home
February 1-March 8, Tuesdays, 6:30 pm–8:30 pm
This immersive, six-week course with Kelly D. Norris, horticulturist and author, introduces participants to horticultural ecology through a study of wild plant communities and gardening on the wild side in the residential context. Throughout the course, plantsman and planting designer Kelly Norris will adapt insights from the scientific literature into horticultural practices that will guide participants towards cultivating wilder gardens rich with beauty, interest and life. The course explores ecological planting design in-depth. Participants will learn how to develop site-specific, regionally appropriate plant palettes and how to apply them to their home landscape regardless of where they live and garden. Fee. Pre-Registration. JC Raulston Arboretum, Raleigh. jcra.ncsu.edu.

Virtual Walk on the Wild Side: Designing for the Native Plant Shade Garden
February 3, 11am-12noon
Gardening in the shade offers an entirely new opportunity. In this online presentation, the staff of the Blomquist Garden—curator Annabel Renwick, horticulturist Maegan Luckett, and assistant horticulturist Isaac Lund—will include design strategies and propose a menu of native plants that will create a beautiful, changeable garden season by season. Beyond beauty, you can also minimize your maintenance tasks and provide health benefits for all. Free. Registration is at https://duke.is/nfz9u. Duke Gardens, Durham. gardens.duke.edu. 919-668-1707, [email protected]

Gardening in the South
February 5, 9am–12noon
Container gardening fits nicely into the active lifestyles of many gardeners who feel the pressures of limited time and space. Regardless of your limitations, growing in containers is freeing and provides ample opportunities to expand the plant palette! Brian Jackson and Leanne Kenealy, NC State University and Horticulturist will discuss potting media options for a successful container garden and many lessons learned from growing in containers to make you a more successful gardener. Free. Pre-Registration. JC Raulston Arboretum, Raleigh. jcra.ncsu.edu.

Seasonal Celebrities: Winter Plants for Your North Carolina Garden
February 5, 10am-11am
In this online presentation with Jan Little, director of education and public programs at Duke Gardens, you will learn a palette of beautiful and useful plants. We’ll begin with a general horticulture discussion and then introduce a selection of trees, shrubs and perennials, noting their native region, culture, care, design attributes and history with people. The plant list this week will focus on hollies (Ilex spp.) Please join us for one or all Seasonal Celebrities sessions; register for each week from January 22 to March 12 separately. Fee. Registration is at https://duke.is/nfz9u; register for additional sessions separately. Duke Gardens, Durham. gardens.duke.edu. Information: 919-668-1707, [email protected]

Grafting Workshop and Scion Exchange
February 5, 11am-1pm
Learn how to create fruit trees that grow multiple varieties. Introduce new fruit options to a crowded yard. Grafting is the process of attaching one variety of plant to a different variety of plant (such as a Fuji apple onto a Gala apple tree). The workshop includes a grafting demonstration that will show you how to graft and what plant combinations will be successful. Supplies for grafting will be provided. If you have fruit trees, please bring labeled “scions” (twigs) from your plants to exchange with other participants. The more plant varieties people bring– the better! Free. SEEDS 706 Gilbert Street, Durham, NC. 27701. Registration for the event and more information at trianglefruitandnutgrowers.weebly.com or email [email protected]

Winter Wetland Mystery
February 5, 1pm-4pm
The wildlife at Walnut Creek Wetland Park have been up to some good-natured mischief! We need your help to solve the mystery and track down the suspects during a Winter Mystery in the Wetland. Bring your whole family and help us solve the riddles of the “who-done-it?” We’ll celebrate our puzzle-solving skills with cookies and hot chocolate at the end! After registering, families will be notified of their scheduled start time. (Start times will be staggered). Appropriate for all ages, however, some trail surfaces are not wheeled-device accessible. Fee. Walnut Creek Wetlands, Raleigh. raleighnc.gov.

Plant Propagation: Vegetables from Seed
February 8, 2pm-3:30pm
Variety is the spice of life in a vegetable garden. Starting your vegetables from seed gives you the opportunity to expand the varieties of plants you grow, from that unusual bean to the squash that the local retailers just don’t offer. Learn the benefits of growing vegetables from seed in this online presentation as Doris Duke Center Gardens horticulturist Lindsey Luks guides you through the process from germination to harvest. Fee. Registration is at https://duke.is/nfz9u. Duke Gardens, Durham. gardens.duke.edu. 919-668-1707, [email protected]

Geology for Botanists and Ecologists
February 5-26, Saturdays 1:30pm-4:30pm
This primarily lecture course is a survey of the principles of geology most important to the distribution of native plants and natural communities. Classes cover the different types of rocks, their chemical and physical effects on the soils that form from them, the geological processes that shape the earth’s surface and the landforms that result from them, and the way natural communities align with these patterns. This course is intended for a broad audience, but some familiarity with natural communities, native plants, and some exposure to basic chemistry will be beneficial. Fee; preregistration. North Carolina Botanical Garden, Chapel Hill. ncbg.unc.edu.

Be a Science Partner: Community Science Project Review
February 8, 7pm-8pm
Community science allows the public to partner with scientists. Community members assist with hands-on data collection to further research. Imagine the scale of data that is possible with public participation from around the globe! In this online presentation, Chris Goforth, head of citizen science for the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences, and Kati Henderson, educator at Duke Gardens, will discuss the goals and methods of community science and then review a number of projects that may interest you. Co-sponsored by Triangle Land Conservancy, Ellerbe Creek Watershed Association, and Duke Gardens. Following registration, you will receive an email confirmation with the Zoom link, and a Zoom session recording will be sent to all registrants afterward. Fee. Pre-Registration. Sarah P. Duke Gardens, Durham. 919-668-1707. [email protected] gardens.duke.edu.

The Living Soil
February 10, 3pm-4:30pm
As any gardener will tell you, soil is not dirt! Every day we are learning more about soil and its role in a healthy ecology. In this online presentation, Annabel Renwick, curator of the Blomquist Garden of Native Plants will discuss with you how to assess your soil, how to feed soil and encourage soil microorganisms, and how to continue improving soil using the natural systems that make life possible for all. Co-sponsored by Triangle Land Conservancy, Ellerbe Creek Watershed Association, and Duke Gardens. Following registration, you will receive an email confirmation with the Zoom link, and a Zoom session recording will be sent to all registrants afterward. Fee. Pre-Registration. Sarah P. Duke Gardens, Durham. 919-668-1707. [email protected] gardens.duke.edu.

Seasonal Celebrities: Winter Plants for Your North Carolina Garden
February 12, 10am-11am
In this online presentation with Jan Little, director of education and public programs at Duke Gardens, you will learn a palette of beautiful and useful plants. We’ll begin with a general horticulture discussion and then introduce a selection of trees, shrubs and perennials, noting their native region, culture, care, design attributes and history with people. The plant list this week will include grape hollies (Mahonia spp.), plum yew (Cephalotaxus spp.), cypress (Cupressus spp.), false cypress (Chamaecyparis spp.), Chinese fir (Cunninghamia sp.), and Japanese cedar (Cryptomeria japonica). Please join us for one or all Seasonal Celebrities sessions; register for each week from January 22 to March 12 separately. Fee. Registration is at https://duke.is/nfz9u. Duke Gardens, Durham. gardens.duke.edu. 919-668-1707, [email protected]

Plant Exploration with a Purpose
February 12, 10am-11:30am
Cohosted by the Piedmont Chapter of the North American Rock Garden Society and the JC Raulston Arboretum. With Scott McMahan, Manager of International Plant Exploration, Atlanta Botanical Garden. This program is being offered in person as well as online. Fee. Pre-Registration. JC Raulston Arboretum, Raleigh. jcra.ncsu.edu.

A Beginner’s Guide to Orchids
February 12, 10am-12noon
Learn from the orchid devotees in this online presentation from the Triangle Orchid Society. You will discover the various types of orchids suitable for home growing and learn their lighting, watering and fertilizing needs. The second part of the program is a Q & A session to encourage participants to ask questions about their own orchids, including the best repotting methods and places to find new orchids. Fee. Registration is at https://duke.is/nfz9u; register for additional sessions separately. Duke Gardens, Durham. gardens.duke.edu. 919-668-1707, [email protected]

Houseplants: How Plants Grow
February 16, 3:30pm-4:30pm
Join us for a look at houseplants and their characteristics. In this two-session online presentation with Scott Zona, Ph.D., botanist, and research collaborator at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Herbarium, will review the growth forms of plants, introducing the terms for each, so you can better understand how your houseplants grow. Then he will introduce the aroids, orchids, agaves, and bromeliads, covering the characteristics and specialties of each family. Please note there is a follow up pair of classes in this series scheduled for Wednesday, March 2 and 9 from 3:30-4:30 p.m. Register for both sets and receive an additional discount. Fee. Two sessions, Wednesdays, Feb. 16 & 23, from 3:30-4:30 p.m. Registration is at https://duke.is/nfz9u. Duke Gardens, Durham. gardens.duke.edu. 919-668-1707, [email protected]

Winter Flowers After Hours Tour
February 16, 4:30pm-5:15pm
Enjoy the flowers of the day at Duke Gardens on a 45-minute in person and entirely outdoor guided tour at the Gardens with Gardens docents or staff. Meet at the Doris Duke Center; the tour will end in the Gardens so you have the chance to linger and enjoy on your own. Free. Registration is at https://duke.is/nfz9u. Duke Gardens, Durham. gardens.duke.edu. 919-668-1707, [email protected]

Pruning: Shrubs
February 17, 1:30pm-2:30pm
Pruning can help minimize disease, direct growth and lessen future problems. In this online demonstration by Bobby Mottern, director of horticulture at Duke Gardens, will discuss goals, methods and timing while demonstrating proper pruning techniques on several shrubs. You will see demonstrations of structural pruning techniques, renewal pruning and hedging methods, along with tool and safety reviews. Fee. Registration is at https://duke.is/nfz9u. Duke Gardens, Durham. gardens.duke.edu. 919-668-1707, [email protected]

Fire Ecology
February 17, 7pm-8:30pm
Why do some plants benefit from fire? In this four-part online class, Dan Richter, professor of soils and forest ecology at Duke University, will take you through the history of landscape fires in America, describing its role in shaping the landscape and what happened once fire was controlled and no longer a force in the landscape. The use of prescribed burning and its role in shaping todays landscape will also be discussed. Fee. Four sessions, Thursdays, Feb. 17-March 10, 7-8:30 p.m. Registration is at https://duke.is/nfz9u. Duke Gardens, Durham. gardens.duke.edu. 919-668-1707, [email protected]

Annual Hellebore Festival
February 18, 19, 25, 26, 9am-4pm
Pine Knot Farms, Clarksville, VA. Pineknotfarms.com.

Winter Open House
February 18-20 and 25-27, Fri-Sat 9am-5pm, Sun 12noon-5pm
Camellia Forest Nursery, Chapel Hill. Camforest.com.

Great Backyard Bird Count
February 18-21
Birds are everywhere, all the time, doing fascinating things. Join us when the world comes together for the love of birds. Watch birds for 15 minutes or more, at least once over the four days. Count all the birds you see or hear within your planned time/location and use the best tool for sharing your bird sightings. Free. Details at birdcount.org

Winter Symposium
February 19, 9am–12noon
Celebrate the Chinese New Year with the JC Raulston Arboretum. It may be the year of the tiger, but we’ll be focusing on the flora of China and West Lake, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. West Lake is among the most inspirational locations in China for Chinese garden designers. Fee. Pre-Registration. JC Raulston Arboretum, Raleigh. jcra.ncsu.edu.

Design Basics: Site Analysis
February 19, 9:30am-10:30am
Designing a landscape is like a stack of nesting dolls, each doll is another layer of decisions. Site analysis is the starting point in developing a landscape, allowing you to focus on what is there and then evaluate: sun patterns, drainage pathways, views to retain and those to screen, existing plants, soil, etc. In this two-part online class, Eli Feldman, landscape designer and Ruth Mary Meyer Japanese Garden horticulturist at Duke Gardens, will introduce you to the methods and tools to complete a site analysis in this two-part class, assisting you to uncover both the limitations of your site and its potential. Following registration, you will receive an email confirmation with the Zoom link, and a Zoom session recording will be sent to all registrants afterward. Fee. Pre-Registration. Sarah P. Duke Gardens, Durham. 919-668-1707. [email protected] gardens.duke.edu.

Seasonal Celebrities: Winter Plants for Your North Carolina Garden
February 19, 10am-11am
In this online presentation with Jan Little, director of education and public programs at Duke Gardens, you will learn a palette of beautiful and useful plants. We’ll begin with a general horticulture discussion and then introduce a selection of trees, shrubs and perennials, noting their native region, culture, care, design attributes and history with people. The plant list this week will include Leyland cypress (Cupressus × leylandii), hellebores (Helleborus spp.), eastern red cedar (Juniperus virginana), partridgeberry (Mitchella repens), and Christmas fern (Polystichum acrostichoides). Please join us for one or all Seasonal Celebrities sessions; register for each week from January 22 to March 12 separately. Fee. Registration is at https://duke.is/nfz9u; register for additional sessions separately. Duke Gardens, Durham. gardens.duke.edu. 919-668-1707, [email protected]

Introduction to Environmental Justice
February 22, 7pm-8pm
In this online presentation, Tatiana Height, instructor of interdisciplinary studies and science, technology, and society and doctoral candidate in agricultural and extension education at North Carolina State University, will provide an overview of the history of environmental racism and injustice, a summary of the activist response, and spin offs within the environmental justice movement. Participants will leave with a basic understanding of environmental justice and ideas for applying their learnings in their own life. Fee. Registration is at https://duke.is/nfz9u. Duke Gardens, Durham. gardens.duke.edu. 919-668-1707. [email protected]

Photography Walk
February 24, 1pm–3:30pm
“Photographing Nature’s Design Close-up in the Greenhouse” with Mary Louise Ravese, Bella Vista Photography. When it’s chilly outdoors, it’s a great opportunity to turn to the greenhouse for photo opportunities. Join instructor Mary Louise Ravese at NC State University’s greenhouse conservatory where you’ll be able to photograph a variety of plants including orchids, tropicals, succulents, cactus, and more. Mary Louise will discuss how to showcase the shapes, colors, and textures of the conservatory plants’ foliage and flowers with your compositional design.In this month’s session she will also explain the settings and techniques she uses to get close-up shots using a DSLR or mirrorless camera. Fee. Pre-Registration. JC Raulston Arboretum, Raleigh. jcra.ncsu.edu.

Plant Propagation: Cuttings
February 24, 2pm-3pm
Plants are amazing creatures. Many are able to clone themselves from a stem cutting. In this online presentation, Beth Hall Hoffman, Paul J. Kramer Plant Collections Manager, and Jason Holmes, curator of the Doris Duke Center Gardens at Duke Gardens. will take you through the process and timing of collecting, preparing, and growing new woody plants from cuttings. Fee. Registration is at https://duke.is/nfz9u. Duke Gardens, Durham. gardens.duke.edu. 919-668-1707, [email protected]

Plant Taxonomy
February 25-March 11, Fridays 1:30pm-4:30pm
This course builds on the fundamentals taught in Botany and prepares students for supplementary material covered in Flowering Plant Families. It is a core course for students enrolled in either of the NCBG public certificate programs. Students learn the basic concepts of the taxonomy of vascular plants and how to identify plant families by making observations of selected characteristics. The use of taxonomic keys is introduced. Interesting examples are studied to illustrate current issues in plant taxonomy and nomenclature. This course serves as a prerequisite for Flowering Plant Families. Fee; preregistration. North Carolina Botanical Garden, Chapel Hill. ncbg.unc.edu.

Introduction to Growing Citrus in North Carolina
February 26, 9am–11am
You don’t have to live on the Gulf Coast (or the Left Coast) to grow delicious citrus. Frank Hyman and a number of others have been growing citrus trees in the Triangle both in-ground or in pots for years. How would you like to grow the most valuable lemon in your own back yard without protection (it’s more valuable than Meyer lemon)? How would you like to harvest home grown Clementines, kumquats, and yes, even Meyer lemons and others in winter inside your own home? Not to mention the pleasure of fragrant flowers, fragrant leaves, and evergreens to decorate for Christmas. Class includes a slideshow, handout of resources, and plenty of Q&A time. Fee. Pre-Registration. JC Raulston Arboretum, Raleigh. jcra.ncsu.edu.

Seasonal Celebrities: Winter Plants for Your North Carolina Garden
February 26, 10am-11am
In this online presentation with Jan Little, director of education and public programs at Duke Gardens, you will learn a palette of beautiful and useful plants. We’ll begin with a general horticulture discussion and then introduce a selection of trees, shrubs and perennials, noting their native region, culture, care, design attributes and history with people. The plant list this week will include first breath of spring (Lonicera fragrantissima), Japanese camellia (Camellia japonica), clematis (Clematis spp.), holly fern (various species in the wood fern family), poet’s laurel (Danae racemosa), Japanese aralia (Fatsia spp.), and andromeda (Pieris spp.). Please join us for one or all Seasonal Celebrities sessions; register for each week from January 22 to March 12 separately. Fee. Registration is at https://duke.is/nfz9u; register for additional sessions separately. Duke Gardens, Durham. gardens.duke.edu. 919-668-1707, [email protected]

Rain Barrels and Rain Gardens
February 26, 10am-11:30am
Learn the basics of how to design and install a rain garden or rain barrel for your home and how these simple measures can help protect our streams and wildlife. After a brief introduction to stormwater and its impacts to streams, this class will focus on choosing appropriate locations and sizes for rain barrels and rain gardens and maintaining them for maximum aesthetic and environmental benefits. This class will also discuss using native plants and other DIY practices for protecting our natural resources. Free. Walnut Creek Wetlands, Raleigh. raleighnc.gov.

Introduction to Mushroom Foraging: Learn a Year’s Worth of Wild Edible Mushrooms in One Day
February 26, 1pm–3pm
Want to learn to safely identify morels, black trumpets, chanterelles, and other delicious, edible mushrooms? Learn to identify the dozen most delicious mushrooms with professional forager and columnist Frank Hyman. A mushroom walk on any given day may only expose you to two or three edible mushroom—and that’s if the weather cooperates. In this class you can learn to identify an entire year’s worth—a dozen—of the best-tasting, easy to identify mushrooms (no poisonous look-alikes) presented in one indoor sitting. Class includes a slide show of professional photographs, display of tools and field guides, handout with resources, and plenty of Q&A time. Fee. Pre-Registration. JC Raulston Arboretum, Raleigh. jcra.ncsu.edu.

Front Yard Foraging: Edible Ornamental Plants and Gourmet Weeds, Too
February 27, 2pm-4pm
You can forage for delicious edibles right outside your front door. Turn your “weeding” chore into a feeding frenzy by harvesting edible weeds like purslane, chickweed, sorrel, dayflower, bedstraw, and many others. There are also ornamental plants in the average garden that are edible and delicious too: beautyberry, hibiscus, Solomon seal, daylily and lots more. Horticulturist and forager Frank Hyman will share a slideshow featuring a year’s worth of delicious and nutritious edibles that thrive in the garden whether you plant them or not. Class includes a one-page handout, plenty of time for Q&A, sample plants to pass around and a chance to buy signed copies of Frank’s book How to Forage for Mushrooms Without Dying as well as a colleagues pocket sized book on foraging wild, edible plants. Learn more about Frank at www.frankhyman.com. Fee. Durham location—details with ticket purchase from [email protected]

Gardening Adventures with Extension Master Gardener Volunteers
February 28, 10am–11:30am
“Lawns: Their Establishment, Maintenance and Renovation” with Dennis Graban, Extension Master Gardener Volunteer of Wake County. Dennis will discuss how to choose the best lawn for your landscape, get it established, and take care of it for an enjoyable lawn for years to come. This program is being offered in person as well as online. Fee. Pre-Registration. JC Raulston Arboretum, Raleigh. jcra.ncsu.edu.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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